10 Amazing Facts About Harpy Eagle

Cool Facts
3 min readAug 12, 2020
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The harpy eagle is unbelievable, albeit hardly any individuals have seen one in nature. Early South American travellers named these extraordinary feathered creatures after shrews, the ruthless “unpleasant, flying animals with snared bill and hooks” of Greek folklore. This dull dark-winged animal of prey has an extremely unmistakable look, with quills on its head that fan into a striking peak when the feathered creature feels compromised. Some littler dark plumes make a facial circle that may center sound waves to improve the fledgling’s hearing, like owls.

Here 10 Amazing Facts About Harpy Eagle

  1. Harpy Eagle is the largest eagle bird. The females are larger than males, as is often the case with prey birds. The birds will grow to about 36–40 inches. Females weigh between 6–9 kg (13–20 lbs). Males weigh 9–11 lbs (4–5 kg). Its wings are fairly small, which helps the bird to navigate through its dense forest climate.
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2. Harpies are good for saving valuable energy. A harpy eagle would never fly over the top of a rainforest. Rather, the ground-breaking harpy flies beneath the timberland shade and uses its incredible claws to grab up monkeys and sloths that can weigh as much as 17 pounds (7.7 kilograms). A harpy is skilled, in a genuine pursue, of arriving at paces of 50 miles for every hour (80 kilometers for every hour). It plunges down onto its prey and grabs it with outstretched feet.

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3. Historically, Harpy Eagles were found across Central and South America from southern Mexico all the way down to northern Argentina. Harpy Eagles are unfortunately declining mostly because people are killing and shooting their habitat. The largest known breeding population in Central America is found in Panama, near the border with Colombia. In El Salvador, Harpy Eagles are possibly extinct.

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4. Harpy eagles mate for life. The female lays two white eggs high in a tree in a large stick nest, and together, they raise one chick every 2–3 years. Around 53–58 days later, the first chick hatches, the second egg is overlooked and has no hatch. The chick flees in about six months, but the parents keep feeding it for another six to ten months. harpy often builds its nest in the crown of the kapok tree, one of the tallest trees in South America.

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